In celebration of the inauguration of the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization, Cairo had the night of its life lit by its Golden Parade moving its 22 Ancient Egyptian Royals to their new home.

Courtesy of Hassan Allam Holding

The country’s ancient rulers, who date back to the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th Dynasties, left their decades-long residence in the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square to move to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Egypt’s first Islamic capital, Al-Fustat. President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi received the mummified kings and queens, who travelled by golden carriages decorated in ancient Egyptian style. The mummies were placed in special containers filled with nitrogen to preserve their condition throughout their trip.

The 30-minute journey was amplified by a stellar symphony performance by the Orchestra of Philharmonic Union. Led by the Egyptian Maestro Nader Abbassi, more than 100 Egyptian players of different instruments introduced the unforgettable act. The symphony’s music simulates ancient Egypt’s ambience by folk instruments and lyrics taken from the Book of the Dead. The spectacle was paralleled by a one-of-a-kind parade in the streets and a captivating pharaonic choreography performed across Egypt’s major archaeological sites such as the Grand Egyptian Museum, the Pyramids, the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, and the Pyramid of Djoser.

The Golden Parade smoothly alternates between both performances, reflecting the multi-layered Egyptian heritage. Correspondingly, President Al-Sisi was briefed on a detailed explanation of the interior design of the new museum by the Minister of Tourism and Antiquities Khaled El-Enany. Enany explained that the museum interweaves different eras and civilizations together, with facets from the Islamic, Coptic, Roman, Greek and of course, the Egyptian civilization.

Courtesy of Hassan Allam Holding

With 21 canon shots to salute the arrival of the Royal Mummies, the museum becomes the first to be dedicated to display artifacts that tell the story of one of the richest and greatest civilizations in the world – from ancient times to contemporary Egypt. The National Museum of Egyptian Civilization is dubbed as one of the largest museums of civilization in the world, carried out by Egypt in cooperation with UNESCO.

The new resting place consists of sleek, low-rise buildings topped with a pyramid amid expansive grounds. Hassan Allam Holding carries out the construction and building works of the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization, within the framework of the partnership between Hassan Allam Group and the Egyptian governorate on many national and strategic projects.

The grand opening also saw the screening of a documentary which presented the phases of the Egyptian archaeological museums’ development. The documentary showcased how the Pyramids archeological area has been fully restored in preparation of the opening of the Grand Egyptian Museum in 2021.

It is worth noting that Hassan Allam Holding has recently won a contract to manage the operations of the Grand Egyptian Museum, as part of the country’s strategy to support and advance the tourism sector. Hassan Allam, CEO of Hassan Allam Holding, previously said, “It is an unparalleled honor to have been chosen to provide and operate services and facilities at what will be one of the most important museums in the world. Egypt’s rich history and attractions already offer visitors a diverse experience. GEM builds on this and elevates Egypt to a commanding place on the global tourist map. We are pleased to begin working towards the government’s strategy to develop sustainable museums and attractions.”